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Eastern Orthodox Church Behaviour
Of the Christian tradition comprising:
 Orthodox Church of Russia,  Greek (Orthodox) Church,  Ethiopian Orthodox, 
and their various other off-shoots.
– ALL DATA SUBJECT TO CONTINUING REFINEMENT –
 
  588
Patriarch John (the Faster) assumes the title 'Ecumenical (universal) Patriarch'; which title, in spite of protest by the Roman popes (Pelagius II, and later Gregory I), is later handed down to his successors.
 
  718
Pope Leo III sends a representative to Constantinople to remove the image of Christ from over the Bronze Gate of the city and replace it with a simple cross.
The Roman legate is murdered by a mob and his corpse sent back to Rome clutching the cross he tried to erect.
 
  726
Patriarch Germanus appeals to Pope Gregory II against Byzantine Emperor Leo III's edict for the destruction of church images which obstruct the conversion of Jews and Muslims.
Germanus is deposed, and the Pope condemns Leo's actions.
 
  866
King Boris I of Bulgaria writes to the Pope Nicholas I with 106 questions, including queries on the impositions of the Orthodox church (Byzantine) in Bulgaria, such as:
•  Prohibition of bathing on Wednesdays and Fridays
•  Prohibition on wearing belts while receiving Communion
•  Prohibition on eating meat of animals killed by eunuchs
•  Prohibition on laymen conducting public prayers for rain
•  Prohibition on laymen making a sign of the cross over a table before a meal
• 
Insistence that lay-folk stand in church with arms folded over the breast
Patriarch Photius, in response to Rome's competitive missionary interest in Bulgaria,  describes the Latin missionaries as:
"impious and execrable men from the darkness of the West ...thunderbolts ...violent hailstones ...
wild boars trampling up the Lord's vineyard". (Johnson 1976 p.182).
 
  c.1053
Patriarch Michael Cerularius closes Latin churches in Constantinople because they refuse to adopt the Greek rite. He is excommunicated by the Roman church (Pope Leo IX) and in return anathematises the pope's representatives.
 
  1054
Roman Catholic Church legates travel to Patriarch Cerularius to deny him the title Ecumenical Patriarch and to insist that he recognize the Church of Rome's claim to be the head and mother of the churches. Cerularius refuses and the leader of the Latin contingent, Cardinal Humbert, excommunicates Patriarch Cerularius, while Cerularius in return excommunicates Cardinal Humbert and other legates from Rome
  1274
Emperor Michael Paleologos is repudiated by the church for submitting to the Pope and accepting the filioque clause ('and the Son') into the creed.
 
  1283
The filioque clause is again repudiated.
 
  13th cent.
Metropolitan of Athens, Michael Choniates, says Latins take longer to appreciate –
'the harmony and grace of the Greek language than asses to enjoy the lyre, or dung-beetles to savour perfume'
Johnson 1976 p.184.
  1439
The Pope (Eugenius IV) obtains the submission of the eastern emperor at Florence, and consequently the Orthodox Church agrees that –
"Filioque has been lawfully and reasonably added to the Creed."
See:
The misleading
Filioque
  1452
Acceptance of the Latin Church's filioque clause in the Creed is announced to an apathetic congregation in St. Sophia.
 
  1541
In Jerusalem, Eastern Orthodox (Greek) Patriarch Germanus institutes the Hellenic Confederacy of the Holy Sepulchre as official guardians of the Christian holy places, while the Franciscans (Roman Catholic) form a national community to guard the same holy places on behalf of Latin Christianity.
 
  1653
In Russia – Patriarch Nikon issues his 'Reminder' to the Russian Church which results eventually in a schism of that Church in 1666 concerning how rituals, such as crossing yourself with two fingers or three, making a bow not lower than the waist, and whether the spelling of Jesus in Russian should be 'Easus' or 'Esus'.
ridiculous rituals
  1672
The Synod of Jerusalem accepts the doctrinal definition of Orthodoxy of Metropolitan Peter Mogila that had been approved by the Four Patriarchs in 1643.
 
  1819
The Greek Orthodox buy the right to rebuild the Holy Sepulchre Church.
The Greek Orthodox Church erases all history of a Latin presence at the site, and the graves of King Baldwin I and Godfrey of Bouillon are thrown out.
 
  1847
In Ottoman Palestine – a violent brawl between Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox clergy in the Nativity Church (Bethlehem) leads to political dispute between France (for the Catholic clergy) and Russia (for the Orthodox clergy) over 'protection' of the holy places.
In the face of Russian demands to exercise supervision over the Orthodox Church subjects of the Ottoman rulers, Britain supports the Ottoman Turks, who had been coerced by France to give Orthodox control of the holy places to the Roman Catholic Church. War between the parties breaks out in Crimea from 1853-56, costing the lives of about 500,000 men.
 
  2004
In Cyprus – Bishop Chrysostomos of Cyprus commits his churches to campaign against the political reunification of Cyprus.
 
  2005
In Bucharest – a 23-year-old Romanian Orthodox nun dies after she is tied to a cross in an exorcism ceremony and left in a cold room for three days without food by members of the Holy Trinity convent. They claimed to be "trying to cast out evil spirits".
 
  2007
May 17: Russian Orthodox leaders sign a pact to heal an 80-year schism between the church in Russia and an offshoot set up abroad, which split off in anger when the Russian church declined to defy the Communist government.
 
  2009
In Addis Ababa – Amharic language Ethiopian newspaper 'Addis Neger' is sued by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, for defaming the church by writing of Patriarch Abune Paulos and the ongoing power struggle inside the church's executive committee. As a result journalist Abraham Begize is arrested and released on bail, after previously being beaten by unidentified men while investigating the crisis in the church's Addis Ababa Diocese.
 
  2010
In Cairo – In response to Egypt's High Administrative Court approving the remarriage of divorced Copts, Coptic Pope Shenouda III (Mohamed Hossam Eddin of Alexandria) declares the decision an attack on their religion for marriage is a religious act of their Church which cannot be dissolved by a secular court decision, and has appealed to the country's president Hosni Mubarak to set aside the court's decision by a presidential decree. The Church asserts that the Bible (as interpretation by them) represents the only frame of reference for Copts.
 
  2012
August: In Moscow, Russia – The Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill lays the foundation stone for the new church of the Federal Security Service (FSB/new name for the old 'KGB') Academy, indicating the Orthodox Church's close relationship with the Russian (Putin) government.
 
  2015
August: In Syria – ISIS/ISIL captures Al-Qaryatain, a town with a large Syriac Christian population, taking hundreds of Christians from both the Syriac Orthodox and Syriac Catholic denominations of Christianity captive, before releasing them to their homes and forcing them to pay jizya (tax) and sign a dhimma (Sharia social contract) to avoid death.
 
   
November: Hundreds of Christian fighters from across Syria have arrive in the majority-Syriac Christian town of Sadad to prevent it falling into the hands of the Islamic State militant group (ISIS/ISIL), the head of the Syriac Orthodox church says. Sadad, which lies just off the vital highway connecting the cities of Damascus and Homs in the west of the country, has faced an onslaught by the radical extremist group's militants since October 31 as it advances across central Syria and inches closer to the capital.
ISIS/ISIL's capture of the town of Mahin, less than five miles away, at the end of October has left Sadad vulnerable to a continued assault by the militant group.
Mor Ignatius Aphrem Karim II, the Patriarch of the Syriac Orthodox church, traveled to Sadad, Thursday November 5, from the church's headquarters in Damascus in a bid to boost the morale of the fighters in the town.
Syriac Christianity is one of the world's oldest Christian denominations. It is an umbrella for a number of the churches of Eastern Christianity, such as the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Assyrian Church of the East, the Ancient Church of the East, the Chaldean Catholic Church and the Syriac Catholic Church.
Its followers speak the ancient language of Aramaic, the tongue that Jesus is believed to have spoken.
 

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